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    I ran the first version of this story 2 years ago.

    Now, that the court case is closed, a follow-up has been made by the BBC to explain the inexplicable actions of the Swedish twin women, who were seized with what may look like demonic possession – but which was ruled by a UK court as “Acute Polymorphic Psychotic Disorder,” a transient psychotic illness, which not only resulted in their own personal manglement, after throwing themselves into congested, fast-moving traffic (once off an overpass) onto the a major “carriageway” (how cute!) of the West Midlands – but the murder of a world-wise altruist, who was stabbed 5 times in 70 seconds.

    Amazingly, no trace of drugs were found in these sisters’ systems.

    Apologies to my American viewers who may not understand the heavy West Mids accents of the people featured. Like myself, I’m fairly certain that anyone else from my many subscribers in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa will have no problem understanding these law enforcement and legal professionals in the UK.

    I don’t know why most Americans can’t understand anyone else. (But that’s a whole other topic).

    In 2008, BBC cameras filmed two Swedish sisters throwing themselves into traffic on the M6. When it was shown on BBC One, nearly 7 million viewers were glued to their screens, and millions more watched it later.

    The footage was shocking. One previewer wrote “On no account miss this documentary. It opens with what is perhaps the most extraordinary footage I’ve seen on TV”. But this amazing footage was only part of an even more incredible story, one which could not be told at the time for legal reasons.

    Now, two years later, this documentary reveals the full story of the hours just before the cameras captured that motorway footage, and the even more chilling story of what happened over next 72 hours, which left one of the sisters fleeing the scene of a crime, after she had stabbed a man through the chest. Those who were at the center of this fascinating legal case, including the police and Crown prosecution service, reveal the complex issues involved in both bringing charges and taking this disturbing case to trial.

    A leading criminal psychiatrist, Dr. Nigel Eastman, explains the difficulties the judicial system has in achieving justice and deciding punishment when dealing with mental illness. He explains the possible causes of the women’s behavior, and why, in his view, it could happen again.

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